HEXAGON PRESS

Tag: Scath Beorh

ANTIDOTE (Part 2)

Dante_Homer_VirgilEditors’ Introduction: The following is the concluding entry in a two-part series of posts by guest contributor Scath Beorh on the topic of “Mythopoetics.” Part one, which offers definitions of the various mythopoetic categories, can be found here. In this concluding section, Beorh elaborates on the nature of Mythopoetics and discusses the role of the mythopoet in a society in need of divine guidance. We again would like to thank Scath for allowing us to feature his work.

LOGOS PREDICATION CHART OF TRAVEL

THE PRIMORDIAL SOURCE BEYOND OR OUTSIDE OF ALL PREDICATION & BEING (ONTOS) -> BEGETS LOGOS (NOUN, REASON, WORD) WHOSE ACTIVE FORM IS  RHEMA (VERB) WHICH  PREDICATES THOUGHT ->  PREDICATES WORD ->  PREDICATES DEED -> ALL THREE LEAD TO THE  GIFT OF THERIAKE (ANTIDOTE) VIA THE BLOOD OF JESUS -> WHICH BRINGS HEALING -> WHICH BRINGS  ATONEMENT WITH & PERFECTION IN THE PRIMORDIAL SOURCE (GOD)

The mythopoet not only trusts no man to lead him—for the promises of God are his foundation—he also nurtures a distrust of all socio-political assertions. At the same time he honors them so that those who follow them can see the light he carries without being able to find fault with him. This measure is principal for the mythopoet who has not only seen the isolation of his own beliefs, but watches the suppression of ancient wisdom at the hands of dogma designed to maintain control of a fragile paradigm threatened by the power of righteousness. Babylon can be found everywhere that righteousness asserts itself. In churches as well as in governments; in universities and well as in the local grange, the insidious creep of control over the people may be found.

Mythopoïesis—the primary tool of the true poet—carries a three-fold purpose:

  • To provide a constructive thesis to use as a guideline for abundant living full of creative and godly imagination;
  • To supply a synthesis of all truths as they relate to Logos Predication;
  • To impart a destructive antithesis equipped to pull down insufficient and aspects of life that have fallen sway to sinister paradigms.

The mythopoet imposes his vision upon a place, refusing to accept a paradigm from it. He weaves a variegated tapestry, often writing of anything and everything. As with any proven artisan, he has his constant—his underlying theme which bleeds through even his most bizarre and seemingly disassociated works.

The creative imagination of the mythopoet is a righteousness-seeking and righteousness-intensifying talent which creates a true vision of reality. He has taken it upon himself to write, and re-write, history if necessary—keeping in mind the ancient mandate that the seanachie, or lore-keeper, should never change the most important facts which work as the unamendable fabric of the narrative. Any rewriting that the poet does is to be done in the spirit of clarification where core truths have been tampered with. It is the very Logos who gives the mythopoet his magical, conscious, far-reaching, and seeing mind needed to maintain the received narrative. With this work of the protection of received wisdom, the mythopoet, as with any seer of the people, may be found at work with narrative that at first may be seen as new lore and undocumented legend, but later understood as valid primeval symbolism and celebrated archaic vision kept hidden by the ancients, thus thought lost.

Mythopoïesis carries the distinct ability to raise history to a different power, and as a body of work is read and re-read, the student moves to higher and higher ground. The mythopoet actually writes place into existence, and destroys soured or profaned places that prove themselves unnecessary to a rightwise existence. Further, the mythopoet reveals his co-creative connection to the Logos by bringing into existence places previously nonexistent.

The linear historian skews what happened in order to propagate the narrative of the dominant paradigm, no matter how profane. The mythopoet, though, writes into existence what should have happened, and so it does happen on some other—and far more important—plane of being. Therefore, mythopoïesis stands as a more philosophical and serious activity than historical writing.

Poets who cause loss of face are not usually desired as comrades, and are persecuted, if not by governments, then by the critics who claim to speak for the people. Friendship and estrangement, however, are the same for the mythopoet, for he sees no one as his enemy and all as potentially ready to hear his message of righteousness and atonement with the Logos. He feels secure in the arms of the One who goes before him. In this place of rest, the mythopoet finds both his peace and his voice as he seeks a rightwise existence in each moment of his life. As the Logos walks with him in the cool of the day, he stands in awe of that Presence and, with eternal gratitude, realizes his atonement with this selfsame Presence.

The mythopoet is called to magnanimous duty, and to shirk this calling is to run from communion with the Logos.

Website Divider 2

Scáth Beorh writes stories permeated with themes of violence, brutality, anguish, punishment, magical realism, and blurred lines between this and the afterlife. Sometimes veiled and at times more overt sarcasm about Christian values and moral inconsistencies underline an ingenious design behind the entertaining tales. The quality of the writing and storytelling indicate an extremely well-informed and competent storyteller. Beorh is the author of the novel The Vampires Of Dreach Fola (JWK, 2016), the story collections Children & Other Wicked Things (JWK, 2013) and Classic Ghost Stories (Editor, Crucifixion Books, 2017), the poetic study Dark Sayings Of Old (JWK, 2013), and the novels The Witch Of Ballinascarty (Ghostley Books, 2017) and Pinprick (Ghostley Books, 2017). Forthcoming works include The Annotated Nephilim Field Guide, Ghostly: A Novel Of Postmodern Ireland, Uncle Treacle’s Bestiary, Hollywood & Vine, The Horror Of Rue Royale, and Stained Glass: Mythopoeic Storeys.

rough edges pattern

ANTIDOTE (Part 1)

Johannes-verschlingt-das-Buch-by-Matthias-Gerung-circa-1530-1532Editors’ Introduction: The following is the first in a two-part series of posts by guest contributor Scath Beorh on the topic of “Mythopoetics,” in which Beorh defines the basic categories involved. We’ll publish the second part, in which the role of the poet is considered in light of his or her true role as mythopoet, in about two weeks. Many thanks to Scath for his insights.

Mythopoetics is worked in three descending levels:

  • Theriake
  • Myth & Legend
  • Speculative Fiction

The highest level of Mythopoetics can be called Theriake, when myth and dynamism meet and combine in the storyteller. Since this ‘keeper of lore’ carries an undiluted theriake, or antidote, for the poison which fills and kills mankind, he becomes an inextinguishable light and healer for all who come into contact with him. His life is often transformed through martyrdom, though sometimes he leaves us through a natural death. On the rare occasion, he departs in toto into Eternity. Paradigms of such ‘living myths’ from the Hebrew tradition are Moses, Solomon, David, Enoch, Elijah, Elisha, Stephen, Peter, Paul, John the Beloved, John of Patmos, and, of course, Jesus of Nazareth and those who wrote of Him. Later we have, among many others, Patrick, Francis of Assisi, Gemma Galgani, and Thérèse of Lisieux. This level is perfect Logos/Rhema predication. The storytellers both live and speak theriake, those looking to the coming of the Christ less so than those experiencing the Christ firsthand. The theriake itself sets forth several things at once:

  1. The Who and What of the Source of Life
  2. Eternal promises made to all who hunger and thirst after righteousness
  3. Atonement, peace, and abiding for those who endure to the end

The next storytelling level is Myth & Legend, which most usually does not put the life of the storyteller in any danger.  Nevertheless, the stories told are considered lofty, and do have an enormous amount of theriake. Logos/Rhema predication in a secondary form is found at this level. Philosophy and Theology find their homes here. From the Greek tradition we have Aesop, who was an Ethiopian slave. From China we have Lao Tzu. Northern Europe gives us J. R. R. Tolkien, George Mackay Brown, Lord Dunsany, James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, and others. Norse and Irish myths fall into this category, as well as the myths and legends of many other world cultures. The storytellers often live the theriake while they speak it, but this is not always the case.

The next level is called Speculative Fiction and has been divided into three styles: Fantasy, Science Fiction, and Horror. Fantasy and Horror have been with us for millennia, and much of these two verge on being mythological. Sci-Fi is a recent addition ca. the 19th century. Allegorical Fantasy falls into the Spec-Fic category. Ray Bradbury is a master of Spec-Fic. The three styles, or genres, work with the feelings and emotions of wonder, terror, and horror… and generally ask one or more of the questions How, Why, What, Who, When, and Where. Ghost Stories additionally give us our forgotten histories as well as frightening glimpses into spiritual realms unclean or beneath divine judgment. At times the storytellers carry antidote, and when they do, sometimes they live the theriake while they speak it, but this is a rarity. Most fantastic writ is not mythopoetic.

Part two can be found here.

Website Divider 2

Scáth Beorh writes stories permeated with themes of violence, brutality, anguish, punishment, magical realism, and blurred lines between this and the afterlife. Sometimes veiled and at times more overt sarcasm about Christian values and moral inconsistencies underline an ingenious design behind the entertaining tales. The quality of the writing and storytelling indicate an extremely well-informed and competent storyteller. Beorh is the author of the novel The Vampires Of Dreach Fola (JWK, 2016), the story collections Children & Other Wicked Things (JWK, 2013) and Classic Ghost Stories (Editor, Crucifixion Books, 2017), the poetic study Dark Sayings Of Old (JWK, 2013), and the novels The Witch Of Ballinascarty (Ghostley Books, 2017) and Pinprick (Ghostley Books, 2017). Forthcoming works include The Annotated Nephilim Field Guide, Ghostly: A Novel Of Postmodern Ireland, Uncle Treacle’s Bestiary, Hollywood & Vine, The Horror Of Rue Royale, and Stained Glass: Mythopoeic Storeys.

rough edges pattern